Monthly Archives: August 2015

Facebook Page Design

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Image: http://pegfitzpatrick.com

Just like your website, your Facebook page (if you have one!) should be engaging and have a clear call to action. Here are some great tips by Peg Fitzpatrick to make your page really pop. If you don’t have a social media strategy, think about creating one. Even if you choose not to “Facebook” or Tweet, your organization should have some clear engagement goals in place and choose a platform that is right for you. Just like everything in business, being consistent and ensuring that your organization’s voice is reflected accurately in the medium you choose (what we call being “native” to the platform”) is of paramount importance. Here are some beautiful photos and tips for your Sunday afternoon!

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Savvy Saturday August 29, 2015

Today’s quote comes from Seth Godin’s excellent blog post today on mediocrity and choice.

Progress is almost always a series of choices, an inexorable move toward mediocrity, or its opposite.

  • Seth Godin
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Life in Latin America 2015: spending, cities and demographics

Euromonitor published some interesting studies this year (2015) related to life in Latin America. Their findings? Latin America is a consumer market is the size of China. Spending is high, savings are low. Urbanized population with large working age population. Check out more with their datagraphic here.

Other studies show that 50% of population across the region have internet access and the average age is below 30. Millenials (the demographic cohort born between 1980 and 2000s) are of strong interest to marketers (and companies) looking to expand their presence in the region.

Our take on the region? Risk and reward. Know your market and make real connections with people in those markets. Mitigate risks both quantitatively and qualitatively. Observe trends but know and promote how your product/services meets the unique needs of those markets.

Savvy Saturday August 22, 2015

You don’t climb mountains without a team, you don’t climb mountains without being fit, you don’t climb mountains without being prepared and you don’t climb mountains without balancing the risks and rewards. And you never climb a mountain on accident – it has to be intentional.

Mark Udall
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Savvy Saturday August 8, 2015

Today’s quote is inspired by my Uncle Paul; a man whose adventurous spirit never failed to delight and inspire those around him. – EMC

Paul Clark

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Mark Twain

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Too Nice to Lead

We have heard the phrase “too big to fail” in the context of companies that are so big and so tied to the economy of a country that their failure would have disastrous national consequences. Some of these companies do fail, making the phrase a tongue-in-cheek epithet and also a severe lesson for many on the transient nature of business.

My partner always reminds me that no one or no business is irreplaceable. What gives a person or organization value in the world of business is being able to solve a problem in a way that their competitor cannot. The idea is to do business with people “who believe what you believe” as Simon Sinek, author of Start with Why, would say.

So what does niceness have to do with this notion of failure and the transient nature of business? Can someone be “too nice to lead” or is this a construct that should be challenged just as business as usual was challenged by the most recent social entrepreneur and conscious capitalism movements in the last decade?

When I was a child, I used to think about business leaders in much the same way as they are portrayed in the Mary Poppins movie – male bankers who live in fancy concrete buildings, care about ROI and are not too pleased with seeing money spent on “feeding the birds”. But I also had a secret desire to see a business person flying a kite! The key then and now is humanizing business and showing that the people leading the business understand human dreams and challenges and use business to help develop or solve those things their stakeholders care about. Can leaders do this successfully without empathy, without compassion and without “niceness”?

Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education has published articles on the link between business and forgiveness as well as business and compassion. Niceness is a positive trait in leaders because it creates a sense of engagement, helps build both personal and corporate brands and fosters loyalty amongst employees, clients and stakeholders. Niceness is a negative trait, on the other hand, if it undermines other values in the workplace such fairness, productivity and value creation; if it stops leaders from breaking down social structures to make the organization work better or encourage innovation.

Niceness therefore is a positive leadership trait when it humanizes the leader, makes him or her memorable but does not compromise what is best for stakeholders and the business. As we move towards customization across various industries it follows that leaders – and the brands they represent – need to be more in touch with their stakeholders and the world around them. If success means creating and maintaining a strong connection with people in and around your business and appealing to the very basic and simple human principles of dignity and of understanding, then “too nice to lead” may just become a tongue-in-cheek epithet of a bygone leader.

– EMC

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Savvy Saturday August 1st, 2015

Today’s Savvy Saturday quote comes from Emily Dickinson and it’s about courage; courage to stand up, say your opinion, launch your product/service/business, go after a new market or take action. Courage marks the difference between action and inaction and, not surprisingly, success or failure.

Happy first day of August!

– EMC

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