Monthly Archives: September 2015

cop·y·cat

Don’t be a “copy cat”. We want to hear your voice, your ideas, your work. Be authentic and true. Write with mistakes and correct them later. Go with the flow of your ideas and you will see that it leads you to somewhere that no one else could have imagined or written down. You cannot copy inspiration. Intelligence. Wit. Yourself.

If you do copy. Do so gracefully. State where you took the information. Hat tip your source. Thank someone who inspired you.

If you copy and take praise, remember that it is not professional and you lose moral authority as a person or entity or project you are associated with. Although the source may never find out, you will know that you did and that’s what matters.

– EMC

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Savvy Saturday September 26, 2015

Processes used to be about quality assurance and repetition. Processes today are about iterative learning. – Esko Kilpi

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Visual Business Inspiration

I have always been inspired by Fashion: art present in our daily lives. As I grow with my consulting practice I have learned that management is an art. In fact, Peter Drucker described management as a liberal art…. liberal because it relates to leadership, wisdom, knowledge and knowing oneself…art because it is practical and applied.

Here is this week’s business inspiration courtesy YSL.

Be inspired! – EMC

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Legacy and Future – let’s not throw away the past!

Strategy + Business published an article about Adidas reconnecting with its past in order to inspire its future. It reminded me of a discussion we had this week while we were “ideating” for the future of one of our organization’s business units; I mentioned the unit’s “legacy” and how this presents challenges and opportunities for the organization going forward.

In the cited article, the authors talk about how Apple, Adidas, Lego, Burberry and others came to a point where each company:

…realized that it had a distinctive history rich with memories, experiences, and signature processes that could be used to design the future — not through a slavish adherence to tradition, but through thinking differently about strategy, innovation, and products.

People and organizations all go through moments when they fail. Sometimes organizations never recover and slowly become irrelevant to their stakeholders. Case in point: Netflix vs. Blockbuster.

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Last year at the Peter Drucker Global Forum I heard Nilofer Merchant talk about “seeing around corners” in order to understand what we should expect as leaders of organizations. For those companies who have a legacy, a history, a track-record, a story, a “tribe” – sometimes it is a matter of looking at “signature” products/services/processes/experiences in a new way. Successful businesses (past, present and future) connect with stakeholders in a unique way: bringing out the best and brightest of the brand, its clients and the overall organization.

EMC

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Savvy Saturday September 19th, 2015

The future of marketing is leadership.

  • Seth Godin
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Visual Business Inspiration September 8, 2015

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A beautiful feast for the eyes. Color, texture, shape and light.

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Being True to You

I was at a birthday party yesterday where there were children from many different countries. A blend of English, Spanish, French, Portuguese could be overheard from the various conversations taking place.

I was talking to a teacher, scientist and mother and she described how important it is for children to have a language that they feel comfortable expressing themselves in. She mentioned that there are some students that don’t have a native language because they are third culture kids or because they have been schooled in international schools all their lives that they don’t feel comfortable expressing themselves in their mother tongue.

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From a business perspective, I can draw a connection between “being true to you” in business and “being true to you” as a person. Just as it is important for children to have a language where they feel comfortable expressing themselves, it is important for companies to remember who they are and how they best express themselves. Of course, it is important to go after a new market or offer a new product or service that fits a growing need you have identified but it is also just as important to not lose the language that makes the company – the brand, the following, the DNA that your clients fell in love with.

Being true to you is being to true to the others around you who love you – as a person, a company or a product/service.

– EMC

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