Tag Archives: balance

Being True to You

I was at a birthday party yesterday where there were children from many different countries. A blend of English, Spanish, French, Portuguese could be overheard from the various conversations taking place.

I was talking to a teacher, scientist and mother and she described how important it is for children to have a language that they feel comfortable expressing themselves in. She mentioned that there are some students that don’t have a native language because they are third culture kids or because they have been schooled in international schools all their lives that they don’t feel comfortable expressing themselves in their mother tongue.

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From a business perspective, I can draw a connection between “being true to you” in business and “being true to you” as a person. Just as it is important for children to have a language where they feel comfortable expressing themselves, it is important for companies to remember who they are and how they best express themselves. Of course, it is important to go after a new market or offer a new product or service that fits a growing need you have identified but it is also just as important to not lose the language that makes the company – the brand, the following, the DNA that your clients fell in love with.

Being true to you is being to true to the others around you who love you – as a person, a company or a product/service.

– EMC

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Savvy Saturday August 29, 2015

Today’s quote comes from Seth Godin’s excellent blog post today on mediocrity and choice.

Progress is almost always a series of choices, an inexorable move toward mediocrity, or its opposite.

  • Seth Godin
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Savvy Saturday August 8, 2015

Today’s quote is inspired by my Uncle Paul; a man whose adventurous spirit never failed to delight and inspire those around him. – EMC

Paul Clark

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Mark Twain

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El contexto sí importa

Previa a la visita del Papa Francisco a Ecuador hubo una explosión de comunicación de palabras, frases e ideas atribuidas al pontífice. Muchas de ellas eran hermosas expresiones de la necesidad de unión, de vivir con alegría, de evangelizar y vivir su fe, de tener vidas coherentes y valientes.

Una buena cita encapsula una idea o un pensamiento y de una forma particularmente esclarecedor. Da a lector o al público, la libertad de imaginar la masa real debajo de la superficie de las palabras como un iceberg. Invita al lector de pensar, contemplar y aplicar esta idea en su vida profesional o personal.

Es justamente esta invitación a la contemplación de palabras que a veces nos hace falta cuando se trata de frases o palabras fuera de contexto. Las palabras hermosas se quedan como palabras hermosas o nos conducen hace pensamientos o ideas equivocadas si no se los entienden dentro de su contexto.El arte de la comunicación es alinear las palabras con contexto paraEl contexto sí importa inducir acciones concretas hacia una meta.

Características de nuestro mundo social y físico inmediato – las calles donde caminamos, las personas que encontramos, las palabras que escuchamos – juegan un papel muy importante en la conformación de lo que somos y cómo actuamos.

El contexto sí importa. Con la visita del Papa Francisco y los mensajes que compartió con América Latina y el mundo, no hay que olvidar el contexto de su comunicación. El lenguaje y las palabras no solo describen el mundo pero tiene la capacidad de crear mundos; las palabras conllevan mucho poder.

– EMC

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Last Bus to Lican Ray: Leveraging Opportunities that Come with Change

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Even the best laid plans have a way of becoming sidetracked by reality. The best analysis and risk mitigation measures can’t predict or control the future no matter how good the team, the project framework or the tools utilized. There’s an uncertainty about life that makes it gorgeously exciting.

When I took the last bus to the town of Lican Ray in Chile during a hiatus from studying at the University of British Columbia (Canada), I chose to get sidetracked, to break away from the norm, and, in the words of the Robert Frost to take “the path less travelled”. But can we apply that same thirst for adventure, quest for knowledge, interest in the unknown to our organizations today? Can we “plan” for the unexpected – not only in terms of risk management but also in terms of embracing the benefits of clashes of ideologies, of frames of reference and of ideas?

By laying the groundwork for innovation and growth to occur as a result – and not just in spite – of changes to the status quo, organizations can be better equipped to be part of the future. One way of doing this is by listening – to customers, competitors, analysts, stakeholders – effectively. Understanding, in the words of Simon Sinek, the “why” behind the product or service and what need, desire or aspiration it fills or seeks to fill.

Another way is by stripping away ego in order to become, once again, like hungry entrepreneurs – vying for the opportunity to show a solution to a problem that no one knew they had. Some organizations promote “intrapreneurship” or recruit talent that proves to be “entrepreneurial”. Others purchase entrepreneurial companies or startups – as much for strategic positioning in their industry as for the technology and talent they acquire through the purchase. Still others create innovation centers or tap into startup hubs to try to replicate the entrepreneurial energy and drive to succeed even before “success” is palpable.

A third way of laying the groundwork to leverage change is by being the change ourselves; looking at what has always been done and doing (strategically) something new. A recent example of this is Elon Musk’s June 11 blog post announcing that all of Tesla’s electric car patents have been removed “in the spirit of the open source movement” and “for the advancement of electric vehicle technology”.

I think there’s a balance between planning for the future and embracing the unplanned opportunities that present themselves; opportunities to learn, collaborate, and change. And it’s a focus on opportunity – coupled with talent and belief in a shared vision – that makes organizations able to survive, and to thrive on, changes to the status quo. Planning will always have its place; but in a world full of complexity and wonder, so will change agency (being agents of change).

Richard Branson said that “opportunities are like buses, there’s always another one coming” but I am glad that I caught that last bus to Lican Ray because taking the road less travelled sometimes makes “all the difference.”

NOTE: This piece was originally published in June 2014 on LinkedIn “Pulse”.

What do you think? Is it possible to build an organizational culture that thrives on change? How do you leverage the opportunities that come from change in your organization?

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Savvy Saturday May 2, 2015

It´s May! Time to shake off doubts, worries and fearlessly move forward in pursuit of our dreams. Have a lovely weekend! — EMC

eleanor roosevelt

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Sinek: How Great Leaders Inspire Action

One of our favorite TED talks… great starting point for any discussion on inspiring action around a brand.

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Savvy Saturday March 21, 2015

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”
― Albert Einstein

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