Tag Archives: lead

Savvy Saturday: Integrity

Integrity stems from the Latin word ‘integer’ meaning whole and complete. Integrity implies an inner sense of ‘wholeness’ and consistency of character. When you are in integrity, people see it through your actions, words, decisions, methods, and outcomes. You are coherent and consistent and that makes you, you.

It also means that people can trust you. They know what they are dealing with. You don’t leave parts of yourself behind; you don’t have a ‘work you,’ a ‘family you,’ and a ‘social you.’ What you say, do and mean is consistent. This builds confidence and trust and therefore it is often quoted that “integrity” is the most important leadership quality.

EMC

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Visual Business Inspiration

b38237cf6fd70846f25ca5f1c201cb49

“People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying no to 1,000 things.” – Steve Jobs

Tagged , , , , , ,

Savvy Saturday August 13th, 2016

“In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way.” – Tina Fey

7799a05ca3ad9cd975d054e9b818a769

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Savvy Saturday July 23rd, 2016

You have the potential to make beautiful things. – EMC

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Lessons from the “Quiet” Person in the Room

Last year I read Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain. It’s a non-fiction book that was on most of the bestseller lists in the United States and Canada in 2012 and early 2013. Cain does a great job at explaining how introverts can contribute to a more creative, empathetic, reflective and – in one word – balanced society.

Embed from Getty Images

The thing about “quiet” people is that they are not actually quiet. As Carl Jung (Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology and the introvert/extrovert theory) says, introversion and extroversion are extremes opposites and most people fall somewhere between the two: “There is no such thing as a pure introvert or extrovert. Such a person would be in the lunatic asylum.”

And that’s why I think we can learn from the “quiet” person just as much as we can learn from the “noisy” one. The challenge is that we are overwhelmed by noise that the valuable qualities of “quiet” people are sometimes overlooked. Hence the imbalance in society and one of Cain’s central tenants in her book and “quiet” revolution.
So what have I learnt from the “quiet” person in the room?

#1. Listening combats isolation
As counterintuitive as it may sound, the best listeners – and usually the quietest person in the room – are less likely to feel the same isolation as vocally assertive extroverts. They are focused on listening rather than talking. They don’t seal themselves off from other people waiting for their next moment to talk. They listen and empathize and, in time, their listening abilities bring them to the real meaning of the conversation and the concern, fears, hopes and wishes of those they listen to.

#2. Empathy and diversity of thought leads to better decision making
Groupthink, “yes” men/women, status quo – all are results of lack of diversity in decision making. By involving more points of view, we are better able to represent the interests of our stakeholders. Quiet people, because of their empathetic nature, tend to see more points of view and can challenge groupthink if they are given the right opportunity. (For more info on how to do this visit Cain’s blog – there are some excellent articles on how to involve introverts in decision making and creative processes).

#3. It’s not always about charisma
In workplaces today, there is an emphasis on collaboration which can sometimes lead to groupthink as mentioned above. The solution is diversity of thought and to appreciate ideas not from where they come from (i.e. rank, title, popularity) but on their own merit. Charisma is not always the trait of the best leader – see Simon Sinek’s Leaders Eat Last – but it does seem to characterize today’s leader.
Cain states that while charismatic leaders may earn bigger paychecks, they do not have better corporate performance. Quiet people have equally creative and valuable ideas that may not be heard. The best ideas are not always the loudest ones.

In closing, there is untapped potential in the “quiet” person that we can only begin to benefit from if we start to balance introversion and extroversion in our organizations. Extroversion has been the ideal for too long.

EMC

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Living in a VUCA world

VUCA

I’m researching a piece for an article in Spanish on how to survive in the VUCA world. VUCA is a term used in the military – and now in strategic management – to describe a world that is:

Volatile
Uncertain
Complex
Ambiguous

We live in a VUCA world. We do business with people in a VUCA world. The key, I’m finding, is having leadership that understands VUCA and can paint a clear vision in order to “see around corners” as I like to say. It’s important to find solutions to problems immediately because in a VUCA world, it doesn’t take months for challenges and opportunities to mature, they strike, it would seem, without warning.

I will share my piece in Spanish – tailored to my public in Latin America – when my article is published. In the meantime, anyone have any thoughts on VUCA would love to hear them!

EMC

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,