Savvy Saturday March 25, 2017

If you always do what you‘ve always done, you will always get what you‘ve always got.

(Quote attributed to H Ford, Einstein etc.)

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Learning & Growing with What Ifs

Today I am reflecting on the International Society for Technology in Education or most commonly known as ISTE.

In this space, I write about leadership, strategy, entrepreneurship, management thinking and Latin American markets. But mostly I look at “what if’s” and asking questions that get leaders in their fields thinking about human centered organizations.

So why am I writing about ISTE and technology in learning? First, it is part of a workshop I am participating in but also, it has a lot to do with “what if’s”. If we are to build learning organizations (organizations that continue to learn and grow through new markets and connections) “owning” own learning and seeking out questions and answers to questions are keys to doing this.

That’s the essence of ISTE Standards:

Promote future-ready learning

And if we look closely at Standards 3 & 4 specifically, “Knowledge Constructor” & “Innovative Designer”, these are really ways to construct knowledge and design solutions based on “What If’s”.

Specifically, Standard 4c called my attention because it is exactly what future ready organizations do when launching a product or service – prototype, test, and refine.

One of my favorite quotes relating to this is from Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn, venture capitalist and entrepreneur promoter:

If you are not embarrassed by the first version of your product, you’ve launched too late.

Striving for perfection (or what we believe to be perfection based on constructs) in a constantly changing world means that we may never get there. As the famous Lewis Carroll said:

My dear, here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that.

Learning through exploration and design through “trying” are tenants of a successful organization. The problem may just be in staying knowledge-hungry students and asking the “what if’s” as we grow up…

 

  • EMC

 

Managers as Myriad Actors

One of the fundamental questions raised during the Global Peter Drucker Forum in Vienna two years’ ago was what our actions will be, as managers, when facing the Great Transformation; in other words, when facing transformational changes that lie in the future for companies, governments and communities alike, what actions will we take today? Will we be one of what Richard Straub, President of the Drucker Society Europe, calls the “myriad actors” who shape the future and impact others or will we abstain from courageous and decisive action?

Peter Drucker talked about the role of managers as “the central resource, the generic distinctive, the constitutive organ of society…” and that managers’ actions are essentially a “public concern” because our survival as a society is “dependent on the performance, the competence, the earnestness and the values of their managers.” (Drucker: The Ecological Vision)

The conversation in Vienna re-examined management’s responsibility to society and humanity. One of the things that drew me to the work of Drucker over 15 years’ ago was his focus on human-centric organizations. And yet, today, we still see organizations more focused on short term profits for shareholders rather than a balance of long and short term value creation for all stakeholders including employees, community and society in general.

Are we doing enough to keep that balance? Many of the speakers did not think seem to think so. They cited studies showing that only 13% of employees around the world are engaged in their jobs (Gallup’s “State of The Global Workplace” report) and that 63% of 1000 corporate board members and C-suite executives surveyed by Mckinsey claim that pressure to generate strong short –term results has increased over the past five years. Clearly, we have a lot of work to do – to shape the future towards value creation for all stakeholders and unleashing the incredible creative and human potential of the people who work with us.

How might we do this? By being “myriad actors”; by looking for ways to shape the future, “see around corners” (as Forum speaker Nilofer Merchant said) and impact others in positive ways. Some organizations, for example, choose to connect leading edge technology and a commitment to improving the human condition (see HopeLab recipient of the Drucker Award for Non Profit Innovation). Others focus on improving employee engagement levels (see Telus, and Dan Pontefract’s work).

I don’t think management can be taught only in a management program; I think it’s a combination of art and edifice – and perhaps this is what Drucker was referring to when he defined management in The New Realities, as a liberal art: “’liberal’ because it deals with the fundamentals of knowledge, self-knowledge, wisdom, and leadership; ‘art’ because it is practice and application.”

We might not know exactly how the future will turn out or how it will shape our industry or impact our livelihoods but we can certainly act – in a myriad of ways – to ensure that we keep humans at the center of decision making within our organizations.

As Richard Straub states in “The Great Transformation” (EFMD Global Focus 2014), “Management is a real world practice of dealing with people and organizations. Managers can make all the difference in the world with their knowledge, their creativity, their emotions and their values.” Managers are myriad actors.

Esther M Clark

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A version of this blog post was published in 2014; two weeks following the Drucker Forum in Vienna.

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Savvy Saturday February 25, 2017

“people who create, craft and love their art tend to focus on these seemingly bad ideas nurturing them into something brilliant. The innovators or the troublemakers who question the status quo may end up making something so remarkable that it creates a movement, a tribe, a following …and major business.”

 

From Esther Clark’s article “Seemingly Bad Ideas” published April 2016.

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Savvy Saturday February 18th, 2017

“Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.” – Aristotle

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Savvy Saturday February 4th, 2017

If you set your goals ridiculously high and it’s a failure, you will fail above everyone else’s success.
James Cameron

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Savvy Saturday January 24, 2017

There’s alot of buzz lately about one of my favorite authors of today, Simon Sinek. Here is a timeless quote from a great book on leadership called Leaders Eat Last.

“the true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”

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